Agoraquest Logo
The only place for the Sony Enthusiast Free Member Registration | Login | Contact Us | Quick Search Forum   
Main Menu
  • Home
  • Topics
  • Forums
  • Reviews
  • The Top
  • Web Links
  • File Downloads
  • Photo Gallery
  • Archived Articles
  • Media Center
  • Useful Sections
  • Sony Issues
  • Sony Alerts
  • Senior Members
  • Premium Members
  • eBay Sony Auction
  • Search Site
  • About Us
  • Recommend Us
  • Members List
  • Bookmark this Page

    Additional Features
  • Linking to Us
  • Owner Manuals
  • Calender of Events
  • Contact Us
  • Stock Market
  • Agorasearch
  • Break It Down Blog

  • Sponsors




    Who's Online
    Currently Online
    Visitors:247
    Members:2
    Total of:249 users
    MemberLogged
    SONYESP3.2 min
    ShadowLord0.1 min
    Users will be removed if they logged out or are inactive for 35 minutes

    Most Online Users
    Visitors:980
    Members:1
    Total of:981 online users
    October 17, 2013, 10:29 pm

    Your Current Status
    You are Anonymous user. Register for free by clicking here.

     Inbox
    Log in to check your private message


      
    Moderated By: claudio
    Agoraquest Forum Index Television Configuration
      
    KV-40XBR800, High Definition 4:3 vs. 16:9 What to do? Dashboard
    Replies: 7 | Views: 2,872
    Last Reply: March 23, 2003, 4:22 pm

    View Printable Version of this thread
    Members below have participated in this thread
    NOVAwhiteTypeS | Jeff_Lam | 40XBR700_Owner | sandorbond | duffy75 |
    Search other threads for related issues/solutions: or use Advance Forum Search
    Get the latest Exclusive Sony News by Joining our RSS Feed or Get RSS Via Email
    Author KV-40XBR800, High Definition 4:3 vs. 16:9 What to do?
    duffy75

    Rank: Sony Fan


    Joined: Feb 26, 2003
    Posts: 8
    From: San Diego

      Posted: 2003-02-26 13:22

    I am curious about something here.

    Since my TV is 4:3, am i going to to be forced to watch all HD broadcasts in 16:9 and lose the screen space?

    I was under the impresion that there are DirecTV HD receivers that are out there, that can scale/alter the HD broadcast to fit a 4:3 format, thereby taking advantage of my entire screen or close to it.

    Is that true or not?

    Are there any KV40-XBR800 owners out there who can weigh in on this issue and advise me on the best way to set up my TV for High Definition?

    If scaling is the way to go for my 4:3, what is the best "first" generation DirecTV HD receiver out there?


       


    40XBR700_Owner

    Rank: Sony Enthusiant


    Joined: Dec 29, 2002
    Posts: 32
    From:

      Posted: 2003-02-26 15:33

    You can crop the picture in 480i (via S-video) and 480p (via component). You can't crop 720p or 1080i. I usually crop a downscaled HD signal in 480i. Looks very good.....and the screen is full!

    EDIT - I have the Zenith HD520.

    [ This message was edited by: 40XBR700_Owner on 2003-02-26 15:34 ]


       
    duffy75

    Rank: Sony Fan


    Joined: Feb 26, 2003
    Posts: 8
    From: San Diego

      Posted: 2003-02-26 16:13

    I dont quite follw you.

    What exactly do you mean when you are saying that you "crop" the pic.

    Are you saying you crop the picture through settings contained in the TV or in the HD receiver itself? Do you crop the sides of the PIC?

    Also,

    I was under the impression that the only HD signal being used on DTV was 1080i. How do you determine the type of signal being output?

    Finally,

    Regarding 1080i, basically you are saying that i will be forced to view any 1080i signal in 16:9 mode right? No recevier can help me on this?



       
    Jeff_Lam

    Rank: Sony Aficionado


    Joined: Nov 06, 2002
    Posts: 125
    From: Santa Clara, CA

      Posted: 2003-02-26 16:14

    Utilize your squeeze mode. That's what it's there for. If a HD signal is 16x9, you should use the squeeze to view it to get the full resolution. If the HD signal is 4x3, you can get the STB to scale it to fit your screen. Not all models can do this though. Some will leave you with a windowboxed image with bars on all 4 sides due to the autosqueeze of 1080i material.


       
    duffy75

    Rank: Sony Fan


    Joined: Feb 26, 2003
    Posts: 8
    From: San Diego

      Posted: 2003-02-26 18:20

    Quote:

    On 2003-02-26 16:14, Jeff_Lam wrote:
    Utilize your squeeze mode. That's what it's there for. If a HD signal is 16:9, you should use the squeeze to view it to get the full resolution.



    But even if i use the squeeze mode, ultimately i will have wasted space right? as it will not fill out my entire screen since my TV is 4:3 correct?


    Quote:

    On 2003-02-26 16:14, Jeff_Lam wrote:
    If the HD signal is 4:3, you can get the STB to scale it to fit your screen.




    If the native signal being broadcast is 4:3, why would i need the receiver to "scale" the Pic? Wouldn't it just autmoatically display correctly since my TV is 4:3 to begin with?


    Quote:

    On 2003-02-26 16:14, Jeff_Lam wrote:
    Not all models can do this though. Some will leave you with a windowboxed image with bars on all 4 sides due to the autosqueeze of 1080i material.



    Can you reccomend a specific model that wont do this and works well with Direc TV?


    Jeff,

    I looked into a calibration by Greg (the ISF tech you reccomended) but i don't think it is a practical option since he is based on the east coast and wont be out here for some time.

    So my question to you is this,

    I know that ISF calibrations have been known to produce dramatic results in RPTV's. Can i expect the same dramatic results for my TV even though it is a Direct view "Non-RPTV" Tube TV? Or do you think it would just be a waste of money?

    I have found a tech in the San Diego area who will do a calibration for $195.00. In your opinbion is it worth it or not since my TV is not Rear Projection?


       
    40XBR700_Owner

    Rank: Sony Enthusiant


    Joined: Dec 29, 2002
    Posts: 32
    From:

      Posted: 2003-02-26 22:30

    Sony HD-200 and Zenith SAT-520 are the best out there. I've got the Zenith with your same tv, only the 2001 model. The crop expands the HD picture to fill up your entire screen. The tradeoff is that you lose a little of the picture on each side. I almost always watch HD stuff cropped. Wife likes it that way.

    Second question. The XBR800 is not as user friendly as my XBR700. I did several service mode tweaks, AXIS, DPIC, DCTR, UDCL, etc, along with overscan, convergence and geometry adjustments. I did this with the service manual in one hand and lots of printouts from several AV websites. From what I hear and see, the XBR800 uses different terms for each item.

    If I were you I would get the service manual from Sony. It will be the best $30 you spend. Second, if your ISF guy knows his stuff, it's probably worth the money at $195 as there is very little info on the three major AV sites on tweaking your tv. To be short in the end, yes it's worth it. My picture is 10x better than before.



    [ This message was edited by: 40XBR700_Owner on 2003-02-26 22:30 ]


       
    sandorbond

    Rank: Sony Fan


    Joined: Jan 26, 2003
    Posts: 6
    From: Northern New Jersey

      Posted: 2003-02-28 22:39

    OK, here is a little primer--
    HD 1080i is always 16:9. Digital broadcasts can be either 16:9 or 4:3, but HD is ALWAYS 16:9 it is part of the standard.

    Now that we've established that -- anything that hits the XBR800 at 1080i will automatically change the TV to display in 16:9. You cannot turn this off if you are inputing 1080i !! And, you do NOT loose resolution viewing HD on the XBR800. The raster changes and compresses the image (the deflection of the electron gun is changed) so that you end up with 1920x1080 in a 16:9 aspect ratio.


    Sandor


       
    NOVAwhiteTypeS

    Rank: Sony Buff


    Joined: Aug 17, 2002
    Posts: 16
    From: Northern VA

      Posted: 2003-03-23 16:22

    Quote:

    On 2003-02-26 22:30, 40XBR700_Owner wrote:
    Sony HD-200 and Zenith SAT-520 are the best out there. I've got the Zenith with your same tv, only the 2001 model. The crop expands the HD picture to fill up your entire screen. The tradeoff is that you lose a little of the picture on each side. I almost always watch HD stuff cropped. Wife likes it that way.

    Second question. The XBR800 is not as user friendly as my XBR700. I did several service mode tweaks, AXIS, DPIC, DCTR, UDCL, etc, along with overscan, convergence and geometry adjustments. I did this with the service manual in one hand and lots of printouts from several AV websites. From what I hear and see, the XBR800 uses different terms for each item.

    If I were you I would get the service manual from Sony. It will be the best $30 you spend. Second, if your ISF guy knows his stuff, it's probably worth the money at $195 as there is very little info on the three major AV sites on tweaking your tv. To be short in the end, yes it's worth it. My picture is 10x better than before.



    [ This message was edited by: 40XBR700_Owner on 2003-02-26 22:30 ]



    I have a 40xbr800 anyway you can send me the configs you changed? i'll paypal you some money

    -----------------
    TV: 40XBR800
    Reciever: STR-DE875
    Speakers: SA-VE525
    DVD: DVP-NS715P
    VCR: SLV-N55
    Remote: RM-AV3000
    Digicam: MVC-CD200


          
    Advance Features
      
    Jump To:
    Locations 
of visitors to this page


    All logos and information in this site are property of their respective owner. The comments are property of their posters. This website www.agoraquest.com, Claudio Meira and Agoraquest, LLC is not tided in any form to the Sony Corporation (www.sony.com). This unoffical website is just place where Sony products are reviewed among the general public. Sony is a registered of Sony, Inc. "PlayStation", "PlayStation2", the PlayStation "PS" logo, and all associated logos/graphics. "Agoraquest, LLC" and "agoraquest.com" are associated exclusively with agoraquest.com, and are NOT associated in ANY way with Sony Electronics, Inc. To view the privacy policy, please click here and to view the terms of use, please click here. If you have any further questions, please contact using our online form.