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    Moderated By: Maxxwire
    Agoraquest Forum Index Amp/Receiver/Speakers/Connections/Cables
      
    Tips for COSMETIC repair of your units Dashboard
    Replies: 13 | Views: 5,568
    Last Reply: March 4, 2010, 1:29 pm

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    Maxxwire | nightmare | jttar | mhedges | dahrich | ShadowLord | SNY4ME |
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    Author Tips for COSMETIC repair of your units
    ShadowLord
    Premium Member

    Rank: Sony Fanatic


    Joined: Oct 14, 2004
    Posts: 386
    From: LA, Ca

      Posted: 2010-03-01 15:22

    Hello Everyone,

    I have been collecting older sony gear for a bit now and while I do my darndest to buy mint, like NIB, etc. I still have to live with the reality that not everyone takes as good care of their equipment as most of us do on this forum. So I wanted to start a thread to see if people have tips on reparing the cosmetic damages (scratches, nicks, dings, smudges, etc..) and general care and cleaning of the outside of the units (removing adhesive, cleaning displays w/o scratching up the screens/plastic shields, etc...).

    I personally have an air compressor I bought at a going out of business sale. Unlike cans, it does not stop (well at least not as quickly), is powerful, and I can use different tips on it. Of course its noisy and I haveto take the units outside to work on them.

    I've also found this site useful:

    http://www.gcaudio.com/resources/howtos/eqptcleaning.html

    So at it guys, lets see if we can come up w/ a definitive Agoraquest cleaning FAQ!
    -----------------
    KDL-55XBR8, HR23-700, Custom HTPC, SLV-R1000, PS3 80GB, BDP-S5000ES, DVP-CX777ES, STR-DA6400ES, TA-N90ESx2, TA-N9000ESx2, B&W 700s, PS-X555ES w/ Orotofon X5-MC & Sony HA-T10, TC-WA9ES, SEQ-333ES, DTC-2000ES.

    [ This message was edited by: ShadowLord on 2010-03-01 15:28 ]


       


    mhedges
    Premium Member

    Rank: Sonyphile


    Joined: Mar 04, 2003
    Posts: 737
    From: Greensboro, NC

      Posted: 2010-03-01 21:14

    If you get a piece that needs cleaning always start with a cloth dampened with water. Use stronger stuff only as a last resort!

    When I got my ST-S730ES tuner it had white crud all over all the buttons. I used rubbing alcohol first and it didn't take off the crud but I think it may have removed some of the lettering by the on/off switch (it may have just been worn from use). After the alcohol I tried water and it took the crud right off. It was like the previous owner ate a dozen glazed doughnuts then pushed every button on it!

    Mark


       
    nightmare

    Rank: Sony Devotee


    Joined: Feb 05, 2003
    Posts: 95
    From: US

      Posted: 2010-03-01 22:03

    I use "Touch of purple", Zaino Z-6 or Z-8, or a very small amount of water with a microfiber towel on the front panels to remove fingerprints and dust. As is so well put in the manuals: "Do not use any type of abrasive pad, scouring powder or solvent such as alcohol or benzine."

    To remove some light scratches and clean up the plastic parts (in my case the cover over the screen on the SA50ES, the strip on the S9000ES, my Dad's WR90ES doors) Zaino Z-14 Plastic Magic Cleaner & Polish works very well. It certainly adds a bit of shine too.

    If you are unlucky enough to get something used with an aluminum front panel and odd paint spots/drips on it, like I was unlucky enough to, you can use a Scotch Brite "NO SCRATCH" pad with a tiny bit a Dawn soap and some patience and safely rub them out.


       
    nightmare

    Rank: Sony Devotee


    Joined: Feb 05, 2003
    Posts: 95
    From: US

      Posted: 2010-03-01 22:13

    And of course for very light edge scratches on black anodized surfaces--Sharpie "Industrial" with Super Permanent Ink.

    If it is accidentally over applied: before it dries it can be quickly wiped off without leaving discoloration on the anodized surface. It will however, remain on the scratched part, making touch-up nice and quick.


       
    ShadowLord
    Premium Member

    Rank: Sony Fanatic


    Joined: Oct 14, 2004
    Posts: 386
    From: LA, Ca

      Posted: 2010-03-01 22:54

    nightmare,

    I've used sharpies before but it never matches right... It's always too glossy compared to everything else. Or is the "industrial" a more flat black? Has anyone tried car paint? How about other paints? Shoe polish? I use a flat black car paint when I want to change the color of computer plastic bezels. I wonder if something like that would give a better result?


       
    Maxxwire
    Moderator
    Premium Member

    Rank: Sony Adept


    Joined: Aug 29, 2002
    Posts: 26074
    From: Portland, Oregon - USA

      Posted: 2010-03-02 01:22

    • Member Quote

    On 2010-03-01 21:14, mhedges wrote:
    It was like the previous owner ate a dozen glazed doughnuts then pushed every button on it!

    Mark



    This could have been the work of children as a friend of mines son once thought that the VCR was a great place to put a partially eaten sandwich.

    ~Maxx~



    -----------------
    A Satisfied Sony Fan Since 1974!



    The OCCC Furu-Charged Sony DB 930


         
    dahrich
    Premium Member

    Rank: Sonyphile


    Joined: Mar 28, 2003
    Posts: 771
    From: California

      Posted: 2010-03-02 12:16

    Hello:
    I use Old English furniture polish on wood cabinets.

    ArmorAll works great on plastic parts

    Dust is removed from exterior crevices with a damp cloth wrapped around a screwdriver blade to reach into corners or intersection of surfaces.

    I was once told never to blow air onto electronic components, vacuum is better. Also, compressed air contains water so if one is used be sure a water trap collects excessive moisture.

    Super glue works great for securing those little corner tabs on veneer covered cabinets that separate from the cabinet.

    I've used Sharpies many times and after applying the ink putting a little spit on your finger and rubbing the area may make it look a little better.

    If you're trying to resurface a wood veneer cabinet don't do what I once did. In an attempt to remove several scratches I didn't realize how thin the veneer was and I sanded through it to the underlying base material.
    No amount of polish could make the sanded area blend in. A trip to a cabinet maker, who applied a new sheet of veneer, fixed the problem but it was an expensive mistake.

    Regards,
    Richard







       
    ShadowLord
    Premium Member

    Rank: Sony Fanatic


    Joined: Oct 14, 2004
    Posts: 386
    From: LA, Ca

      Posted: 2010-03-02 12:21

    • Member Quote

    This could have been the work of children as a friend of mines son once thought that the VCR was a great place to put a partially eaten sandwich.

    ~Maxx~



    Hence the need for a fence:



    :-D

    [ This message was edited by: ShadowLord on 2010-03-02 12:23 ]

    [ This message was edited by: ShadowLord on 2010-03-02 12:27 ]


       
    nightmare

    Rank: Sony Devotee


    Joined: Feb 05, 2003
    Posts: 95
    From: US

      Posted: 2010-03-02 14:14

    • Member Quote

    On 2010-03-01 22:54, ShadowLord wrote:
    nightmare,

    I've used sharpies before but it never matches right... It's always too glossy compared to everything else. Or is the "industrial" a more flat black? Has anyone tried car paint? How about other paints? Shoe polish? I use a flat black car paint when I want to change the color of computer plastic bezels. I wonder if something like that would give a better result?


    I don't think the color of the industrial type Sharpie is less glossy than the ordinary kind, but because you're saying it's too glossy, are you talking about the painted steel case instead of the front panel?

    If so, I think the flat black paint you mentioned would be an excellent choice--I've used some basic flat black spray paint on a steel computer case and it looks about the same as it does on the audio components.

    (Note: when doing that I sanded off all of the old paint first, and progressively sanded the bare steel from a low grit up to 600+ grit before using automotive primer, then sanded it again with the high grit stuff[yes a bit insane I know], and finally putting on multiple coats of flat black paint. But I covered that with a clear coat so I can't comment on durability of just using flat paint)


       
    ShadowLord
    Premium Member

    Rank: Sony Fanatic


    Joined: Oct 14, 2004
    Posts: 386
    From: LA, Ca

      Posted: 2010-03-02 14:55

    nightmare,

    On a big job I can totally seeing myself doing the same thing (a big job being one in which a whole panel is majorly damaged) but for a 0.5cm nick it may be too much!


       
    jttar
    Moderator
    Premium Member

    Rank: Sony Master


    Joined: Feb 28, 2003
    Posts: 9228
    From: Chicago,IL, USA

      Posted: 2010-03-02 22:32

    For those little 0.5cm nicks a little flat black spray paint works well. I have sprayed a small amount of paint into the plastic cap for the can and used the end of a paper match (not the sulpher end) to dip in the cap and apply to the component nick.

    To remove the "gum" left from stickers there is a product called "Goo Gone" that is safe to use on metal or plastic. I always keep a bottle in the house. HERE is a link.

    Joe


         
    mhedges
    Premium Member

    Rank: Sonyphile


    Joined: Mar 04, 2003
    Posts: 737
    From: Greensboro, NC

      Posted: 2010-03-03 21:22

    • Member Quote

    On 2010-03-02 12:21, ShadowLord wrote:
    • Member Quote

    This could have been the work of children as a friend of mines son once thought that the VCR was a great place to put a partially eaten sandwich.

    ~Maxx~



    Hence the need for a fence:







    Amen to that!

    Mark





       
    SNY4ME
    Premium Member

    Rank: Sony Legend


    Joined: Nov 13, 2005
    Posts: 879
    From: Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada

      Posted: 2010-03-04 00:52

    • Member Quote

    On 2010-03-02 01:22, Maxxwire wrote:
    • Member Quote

    On 2010-03-01 21:14, mhedges wrote:
    It was like the previous owner ate a dozen glazed doughnuts then pushed every button on it!

    Mark



    This could have been the work of children as a friend of mines son once thought that the VCR was a great place to put a partially eaten sandwich.

    ~Maxx~



    Thats funny, a good friend of mine had a very nice subwoofer for his HT system. As time progressed, for reasons unexplained it preformed worse and worse and eventually died. It still was under warranty so he took it in for repair. Upon removing the driver, the tech found about 10lbs of various small toys, crackers, cookies, candy, garbage, pretty much anything small enough for his 2 year old to stuff into the port on the rear.

    Needless to say, after everyone had a good laugh they never honored the warranty. LOL


    Anyway, on to the tips and hints.

    I personally only use a damp microfiber cloth to clean my gear and am very carefull if anything requires scrubbing. The microfiber removes finger prints and dust and never leaves scratches. I bought a huge pack of really good clothes from Costco for like $15, worked out to like 50 cents a cloth. Can't beat em.

    Aside from that, if you do break anything on your unit, come here for the service manual first before dismanteling it without instructions. Becuase it's so easy to make a bad situation even worse, with how these machines are assembled these days.

    Lyle



    -----------------
    Sony DA7100ES, NS9100ES, K90ED(2), K30ED(4), CNK10ED(1), X700(2), MF650H(2); Oppo BDP103; Epson 3020; Elunevision Elara 120" Fixed Screen; Logitech Harmony 890; Pure AV PF60


       
    ShadowLord
    Premium Member

    Rank: Sony Fanatic


    Joined: Oct 14, 2004
    Posts: 386
    From: LA, Ca

      Posted: 2010-03-04 13:29



    When I converted my GOLD DTC-2000ES to a BLACK one I used the service manual to help guide me in taking apart the unit and then putting it back together. You really don't want to be pulling on a circuit board never realizing there is a screw from the bottom holding it in place!


       
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