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View topic - DVD and the Blu-ray consortium

DVD and the Blu-ray consortium

This forum addresses questions on Blu-Ray

Moderator: jttar

by -W- » Thu Aug 29, 2002 6:54 am

Greetings Sony enthusiasts:

Toshiba and NEC said their format for blue-laser DVDs, set to hit the market next year and able to store huge amounts of data due to blue light's short wavelength, was more compatible with existing red-laser DVDs and would smooth the transition from red to blue.

www.cnn.com/2002/TECH/ptech/08/29/dvd.format.reut/index.html

-W-
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by Craig_Nike » Thu Aug 29, 2002 1:40 pm

Ahhhh... Tohsiba.... - Sonys *other* arch enemy (apart from Panasonic).

Sony has also shown a working BlueRay DVD player at last CES show in Vegas.

All the companies will be jumping on BlueRay very soon I'd say - thank god for backwards compatability
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by -W- » Tue Sep 10, 2002 6:14 pm

Greetings Sony enthusiasts:

Sony lets you record DVDs for any player

Here's a good read dated September 10, 2002. Note the Blu-ray reference at the end.

Sony lets you record DVDs for any player
September 10, 2002

BY HEATHER NEWMAN
FREE PRESS COLUMNIST

Say good-bye to your VCR.

A new type of DVD recorder announced by Sony Monday is the beginning of the end for traditional VHS videotapes.

Sales of DVD players have already outstripped the aging VHS format, but most folks who own DVD players still have VCRs, too. That's because DVD recorders have posed two problems. Different recorders use different types of discs, so you can't be sure your recorded DVDs will work in someone else's player. And the darn things have been stratospherically expensive.

That doesn't mean people don't lust after DVD recorders. Recording on disc means crisp digital formats that don't stretch and degrade over time like a VCR tape. A DVD recorder in a PC gives you 4.7 gigabytes of space on every disc, a huge improvement over the 700 megabytes on most CDs.

Prices for DVD recorders did come down recently, settling around $400 for a drive built into a computer and $525 and up for stand-alone recorders. But you have had to choose one recording format from a bewildering list: DVD-RW, DVD+RW, DVD-R, DVD+R, DVD-ROM, DVD-Video and DVD-RAM.

Sony's new recorders, however, can produce discs that will play in more than 90 percent of DVD players in homes now. They can also record music, photo and data CDs. (They cannot produce DVD-RAM discs, which typically work only in computer drives.)

Sony reps say stand-alone boxes that will record off your TV will be announced at the Consumer Electronics Show in January and hit the market soon after. PC versions of the recorder will be available in October in both internal and external models.

Prices are better than most single-format recorders: $349 list for the in-computer model, which Sony says is expected to drop fast.

Mark my words: Drives like Sony's will be the reason why people will look back on 2003 as the year the traditional VCR died.

"We're eliminating confusion, we're eliminating risk and it's more affordable," said Bob DeMoulin, Sony marketing manager. "It's going to be a nifty product."

We can expect other manufacturers to follow in Sony's footsteps if the struggle over DVD formats doesn't result in a single winner.

These new drives will force the industry to settle on a single format or move forward with other recorders that support every flavor.

Some videotapes will survive the DVD juggernaut, at least for now. D-VHS tapes, which are designed to hold high-definition television broadcasts, can store more than a consumer-recorded DVD and at high quality. They're also horrendously expensive: JVC's D-Theater D-VHS player has a list price of $1,999.

They're likely to be replaced in turn by yet another flavor of DVD recorder called Blue-ray, which will hit the market in affordable versions in a few years. Blue-ray discs, which mercifully are all the same format, can hold up to 27 gigabytes of information apiece.


www.freep.com/money/tech/newman10_20020910.htm

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by Craig_Nike » Wed Sep 11, 2002 12:56 am

HT is an expensive interest
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by ToxicTaZ » Sun Mar 23, 2003 1:56 pm

Sony HD Sony PS3:
Sony PS3 use's the (Blu-ray Disc) Drive!
Sony HD-DvD Drive! 36GB DL One Side Disc!
Sony HD-DvD MPEG-4!

http://www.avsforum.com/
http://www.dvdsite.org/


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